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Orangutan:

There are 3 subspecies of the orangutan:

The Tapanuli orangutan (Pongo tapanuliensis): Found in South Tapanuli in the island of Sumatra, Indonesia.

STATUS: critically endangered (population in decline)

Sumatran orangutans (Pongo abelii): Found farther northwest in the island of Sumatra.

STATUS: critically endangered (population in decline)

Bornean orangutans (Pongo pygmaeus): Found on the island or Borneo.

STATUS: critically endangered (population in decline)


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Sumatran tiger: This is the smallest of all the tiger subspecies. It’s stripes are narrower than in other subspecies and it has a more bearded and maned appearance (Tigers.org.au). Sumatran tigers have slightly webbed paws which allows them to swim more efficiently after their prey.

STATUS: Critically Endangered (population in decline). About 300 left in the wild (orangutan project)

Cause for decline:

  • Loss of habitat

  • Illegal wildlife trade

  • Human wildlife conflict.

 

Sumatran elephant: The Sumatran Elephant is the smallest subspecies of elephant, but the largest mammal existing on the island of Sumatra. They love to roam the luscious lowland forests of Sumatra, sometimes venturing uphill to mid-altitudes so long as it is below 300m. The skin coloration of the Sumatran Elephant is lighter than the other two subspecies of Asian elephants (onekindplanet).

STATUS: Critically endangered (population in decline). About 1200 left in the wild (orangutan project)

Cause for decline:

  • Loss of habitat

  • Poaching

  • Human wildlife conflict

 

Sumatran rhino: The Sumatran Rhino is one of rarest mammals on the earth. They are the smallest rhino and the only Asian rhino with 2 horns and unlike other rhinos they have hair all over their bodies. (nationalgeographic)

STATUS: critically endangered (population in decline). About 75 left in the wild (orangutan project)

Cause for decline:

  • Loss of habitat

  • Poaching

 

Sun Bear: Found across South East Asia their comes from the white or yellowish crescent marking on its chest, which many people think looks like the rising or setting sun. The sun bear is the smallest of the world's eight bear species, They also have long, curved claws, large canines, a strong jaw and a tongue that can be up to 25cm long,

STATUS: Vulnerable (population in decline). (No recent population statistic found)

 

Sunda Clouded Leopard: Found across Borneo and Sumatra. Clouded Leopards are so named because of the large, blotchy, cloud-like markings on their body, head, legs and tail. Sunda Clouded Leopards are generally darker with smaller cloud markings each enclosing small spots (wildcatconservatinorg).

STATUS: endangered (population in decline). Less than 10,000  (WWF)

 

Chimpanzee: (Africa) Like humans, chimps have flat faces. Chimpanzees are our closest living relatives, sharing more than 98 percent of our genetic blueprint. Chimpanzees live in social communities of several dozen animals, Although they normally walk on all fours, chimpanzees can stand and walk upright as well (nationalgeographic)

STATUS: Endangered. About 150,000 (WWF)